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PersianChord

Random thoughts.. 7 Band's new album

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1) I'm just wondering why there's so much Turkish style string runs/articulations used in this album? Is there a particular reason that there's so much emphasis on this?

 

2) Why the song writer/lyricist forces the syllables to fit the rhythm or melody in such an odd way? I'm not Fars and even I can come up with some alternative choices to make the lyrics more balanced rhythmically. To be clear, I'm not judging the quality of the poem , but the rhythmic flow of it. Example:

 

Eshghe Man (00:21 - 00:36 )

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qNUt6WgTRw

 

I see this type of writing in their songs all the time.

Edited by PersianChord

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I cant answer your second question but as the answer to your first the Turkish influence is rather big inside the country right now, it has been in the past couple of years even when it comes toe some LA production but inside the country the ballads and rhythmic guitar songs have a tendency to go that way, while before that it was a more Greek influence that dominated similar style of sings. If you take a listen to the whole Jahanbakhsh album you will hear that as well.

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Interesting topic, I will share my take on this matter later on tonight when I get back home.

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Almost all recording artists are influenced by other styles one way or another, but to just completely drown like that in something ? For me this work seemed like a Turkish album influenced by Persian pop music and not the other way around. I don't know the history behind this band, so it might be something they've had success with in the past, or something they have to give to their fans...not sure. I don't remember hearing so much of it in one single album.

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The influence and the trend is also because right now there are several Turkish series being dubbed and shown on persian sat TVs

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First time I heard these guys was when the 3 of them sat in a small boat and sang a love song :D the concept of 3 guys boarding a boat like that and singing like that kind of was odd to me and almost all my other friends who saw the video, I can understand because of the circumstances in Iran things can be complicated, but still you can find much more appropriate ideas to execute music videos, but anyway this is totally off topic, therefore I won't get into details etc.

 

In regards to the Turkish influenced music of nowadays in Iran, it sort of bothers me as well, our Iranian scale music seems to have derived from its origin steering away further and further day after day, as Pourya jaan mentioned the direction used to be that of Greek and Arabic music, while over the years it has gradually and now heavily redirected to the Turkish music influence, ironically majority of the current popular domestic vocalists are comprised of those who have employed this Turkish music style and seems the public enjoys it to its max as well.

 

7th band in particular is one of those heavily influenced bands by Turkish music, or at least this tune "Dooset Daram" which BTW I happen to be one of its admirers myself as it carries a very catchy chorus and instrumental line (Bouzouki)

 

Next music genre being utilized by many other artists in Iran is the Western music influence including the European singing lines which also seems to have drawn in its own audience and fans (Sirvan being one of its pioneers)

 

The question which worries me is the way this trend is leading and proceeding, is it possible that soon our own music style be forsaken and forgotten by the next generation? I hope not!

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I like Sirvan and Farzad Fattahi type of style. At least they're influenced by Josh Groban and such...not Tarkan. Not only that, their style is convincing for me.

 

As for the Eastern traditional style vs. Western Pop style:

There's always one thing to remember. "Harmony" is completely a Western thing. There's no such a thing as "Chord Progression" or even "Chord" in any other culture (Orientals, Indians, Chinese, ....Africans, and not even Turkey). If you listen to the traditional Iranian/Turkish/Indian/Japanese... music you'll only hear Melody and Rhythm. That doesn't mean their music is inferior at all, but it just works in a completely different way. I went to a concert performed by real native Indian (from India) musicians and I was totally overwhelmed by the fact that how many times they changed Keys, and Time Signatures within a 3 minutes long piece! Good luck analyzing and trying to write out that kind of music using the Western Notation system. Even the most modern experimental Western music doesn't have that kind of approach to Time signatures and Scales.

 

The reason I'm saying all this is that Pop Music is %100 Western. Everytime you play a chord, you are playing Western music. Persian Pop music can never be considered original because all the fundamentals are borrowed. It's like throwing a steak on top of Ghorme Sabzi. No matter how you prepare that steak ,you'll still get that Ghorme Sabzi flavor. Poor example, but that's basically what's happening with None Western "Pop Music". I don't think Pop music is the real threat to music sonnati. It's the music education system in Iran that sucks balls. Wait, there's no music education system in Iran at all.

 

 

 

Edited by PersianChord
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