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Sexual sadism

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What is Sexual Sadism?

 

It is important to distinguish between "Sadism", which is the term used in conjunction with Sadistic Personality Disorder, and "Sexual Sadism" which may be associated with SPD yet is classified as one of the paraphilias because of the specific sexual component. The two are most certainly related and an understanding of sadism is paramount to the understanding of sexual sadism but this particular section deals only with the paraphilia of sexual sadism.

 

Sexual sadism refers to the derivation of sexual pleasure from the infliction of pain, suffering and/or humiliation upon another person. The pain and suffering of the victim, which may be both physical and psychological, is pivotal to the sexual arousal and pleasure. The ICD-10 (World Health Organization, 1992) defines sadism as "preference for sexual activity that involves bondage or infliction of pain or humiliation."

Official Criteria:

 

Current diagnostic criterion from the DSM-IV-TR requires the following criteria be met:

 

1. Recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviours involving acts (real, not simulated) in which the psychological or physical suffering (including humiliation) of the victim is sexually exciting for the person, have been present for at least 6 months.

 

2. The fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviours cause clinically significant stress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of function.

While the criteria may appear to imply that the impairment must be perceived by the person in question to be applied, this is not the case. Ie. sadistic behaviour resulting in harming someone would be interpreted as an impairment of function.

Historical Context:

The term "sadism" derives from French medical literature of the early 19th century in connection with the writings of the Marquis de Sade whose novels depict scenes of torture, cruelty and killing for erotic purposes.

 

Krafft-Ebing, in his 1886 Psychopathia Sexualis, later defined sadism as: "The experience of sexual, pleasurable sensations (including orgasm) produced by acts of cruelty, bodily punishment afflicted on one's person or when witnessed in others, be they animals or human beings. It may also consist of an innate desire to humiliate, hurt, wound or even destroy others in order, thereby, to create sexual pleasure in ones self" (p.109).

 

The term was more fully developed in the literature over the next 100 years to the point of today's comprehensive definition:

 

• Schrenck-Notzing (1895) coined the term algolagnia (pain craving) and divided the category into active and passive forms, conceptualizing them as two poles of the same disorder (ie sadism and masochism respectively).

 

• Eulenberg (1911) expanded this definition to include psychological as well as physical pain (ie. humiliation).

 

• Karpman (1954, p. 10) proposed that, in the sadist, "the will to power is sexually accentuated" and that "he revels in the fear, anger and the humiliation of the victim." Hence, pain is not that important in and of itself but because it symbolizes power and control.

• Fromm (1977) suggested that the "core of sadism ... is the passion to have absolute and unrestricted control over living beings, ... whether an animal, child, a man or a woman. To force someone to endure pain or humiliation without being able to defend himself is one of the manifestations of absolute control, but it is by no means the only one. The person who has complete control over another living being makes this being into his thing, his property, while he becomes the other being's god" (p.383-4). Dietz, Hazelwood and Warren (1990, p. 165) reported a strikingly similar personal account given by a sadist.

 

• Brittain (1970) and MacCulloch, Snowden, Wood & Miller (1983) also emphasized the central importance of the eroticized feelings of power and control.

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Types of Sexual Sadism:

 

Krafft-Ebing (1886/1965) sub-classified sexual sadism into several categories including:

 

1. Lust-murder. Here he included cases in which there was a connection between sexual arousal and killing which may extend to anthropaphagy or cannibalism (eating body parts of the victim). Among examples he included "Jack the Ripper" and similar types of homicide

 

2. Mutilation of corpses or necrophilia

 

3. Injury to females (stabbing, flagellation etc.,)

 

4. Defilement of women

 

5. Other kinds of assaults on women - symbolic sadism in which, for example, the perpetrator cuts the hair of his victim rather than harming them directly

 

6. Ideal sadism or sadistic fantasies alone without acts

 

7. Sadism with other objects, for example, whipping of boys

 

8. Sadistic acts with animals

Those eight basic types can be roughly categorized into two main groups of Sexual sadism: Mild sadism in a consensual sexual relationship (eg. S&M) and the major category involving injury or worse, usually in a non-consensual relationship. In both, the element of pain to the victim is the sexual stimulus.

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Causes & symptoms

 

There is very little certainty about what causes a paraphilia. Psychoanalysts generally theorize that these conditions represent a regression to or a fixation at an earlier level of psychosexual development resulting in a repetitive pattern of sexual behavior that is not mature in its application and expression. In other words, an individual repeats or reverts to a sexual habit arising early in life. Another psychoanalytic theory holds that these conditions are all expressions of hostility in which sexual fantasies or unusual sexual acts become a means of obtaining revenge for a childhood trauma. The persistent, repetitive nature of the paraphilia is caused by an inability to erase the underlying trauma completely. Indeed, a history of childhood sexual abuse is sometimes seen in individuals with paraphilias.

 

However, behaviorists suggest, instead, that the paraphilia begins via a process of conditioning. Nonsexual objects can become sexually arousing if they are frequently and repeatedly associated with a pleasurable sexual activity. The development of a paraphilia is not usually a matter of conditioning alone; there must usually be some predisposing factor, such as difficulty forming person to person sexual relationships or poor self-esteem.

 

 

The following are situations or causes that might lead someone in a paraphiliac direction:

 

Parents who humiliate and punish a small boy for strutting around with an erect penis

A young boy who is sexually abused

An individual who is dressed in a woman's clothes as a form of parental punishment

Fear of sexual performance or intimacy

Inadequate counseling

Excessive alcohol intake

Physiological problems

Sociocultural factors

Psychosexual trauma.

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yeh sounds like it LOL :diablo:

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you two would have made a :diablo::diablo: couple!

i'll never have a girl friend or wife ever!!! :diablo:

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you want a boy friend or husband? :diablo:

LOL i left myself wide open, no i wouldent :diablo:

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