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New glacier theory on Stonehenge

 

 

A geology team has contradicted claims that bluestones were dug by Bronze Age man from a west Wales quarry and carried 240 miles to build Stonehenge. In a new twist, Open University geologists say the stones were in fact moved to Salisbury Plain by glaciers. Last year archaeologists said the stones came from the Preseli Hills. Recent research in the Oxford Journal of Archaeology suggests the stones were ripped from the ground and moved by glaciers during the Ice Age. Geologists from the Open University first claimed in 1991 that the bluestones at one of Britain's best-known historic landmarks had not come from a quarry, but from different sources in the Preseli area. The recent work was conducted by a team headed by Professor Olwen Williams-Thorpe, who said she and her colleagues had used geochemical analysis to trace the origins of axe heads found at Stonehenge and this backed up the original work.

 

"We concluded that the small number of axes that are actually bluestone derive from several different outcrops within Preseli," she said. "Axes found at or near Stonehenge are very likely to be from the same outcrops as the monoliths, and could even be made of left-over bits of the monoliths."

 

Source: BBC News

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Very Interesting Siamak Jan! Keep it up! :clap2: :k

 

I would like but nobody read it :c ...

 

 

dont say that siamak, i love this thread! your doing a great job, its always interesting to read your articles!! :friends::friends:

 

 

How to turn yourself into a genius

 

 

What if I were to tell you that just one year from now your IQ could be double what it is today? And what if I told you that all you needed to do was perform a simple daily exercise that would make it happen? In fact, there is strong evidence that by doing this one simple exercise, you can dramatically increase your IQ -- and even make yourself a genius!So what is this simple, easy and fantastic “genius exercise” that will supercharge your brain? This: Keep a daily journal or dairy. Every day, or several times a day, write down all your thoughts on paper. Do it faithfully for one complete year, and you will rapidly grow more intelligent -- guaranteed.

 

Consider:

 

• Researcher Catherine Cox studied the habits of 300 geniuses — luminaries such as Isaac Newton, Einstein, Thomas Jefferson — and discovered that all of them were “compulsive” journal or diary keepers.

• A study determined that only 1 percent of the world’s population habitually engaged in daily journal writing. The study also found that that same 1 percent were almost always super high achievers, and that they almost always lived longer than the average for their time, place and era.

• Thomas Edison wrote an incredible 3 million pages of notes, letters and personal thoughts in hundreds of personal journals throughout his life.

• The brilliant cosmologist Steven Hawking contracted Lou Gehrig’s disease more than 30 years ago and was give just two years to live. Hawking is a shriveled up lump of a human being confined to an electronic wheelchair. He cannot speak, write, or even move more than just a trifle. But 32 years after contracting his disease, Hawking is considered among the world’s greatest thinkers. He remarried a few years ago after a divorce, and shows no signs of slowing down with his contributions to cosmology and quantum relativity theory. Although unable to physically keep a journal, Hawking has used computers and other mechanical aides to constantly record not only new ideas and scientific theories, but his own inner reflections.

• When he was a young man, Albert Einstein took a young woman sailing for a date. The date didn’t go very well. The young woman was frustrated because Einstein hardly said a word to her -- but instead spent the whole day scribbling in a small journal he carried with him.

 

Now here’s some more good news: to get all of the IQ building effects of daily journaling, you don’t even have to write down anything that is even coherent!This fact is demonstrated in the the journal of one of the great minds of the 19th Century, English inventor Thomas Faraday, a man much admired by Einstein himself. Faraday filled thousands of notebooks with seeming utter nonsense. Many have studied the journals of Faraday hoping to discover the key to his brilliant mind. All have been frustrated. In Win Winger and Richard Poe’s book, The Einstein Factor, one researcher wrote:“(Faraday's) Diaries have the irritating form of ideas jotted down, repeated and forgotten … a morass or articulated and unarticulated principles, concepts, observations and physical facts.”In fact, the best method to build your IQ seems to be carrying your journal with you throughout the day and writing down any random thoughts as they come into your head.Now an added bonus: Keeping a daily “random thoughts” journal will not only make you smarter, but may also increase your life span! The evidence for this come from a fascinating study of a group of unusual nuns in Mankato, Minnesota.

 

The nuns are unique in that just about all of them live well past the average age of death for women in Minnesota. Most of them live well into their 90s, and some top the 100-year mark. Few or none of them have ever suffered from senile dementia or Alzheimer's Disease.What do the sisters all have in common? That’s right -- they are all obsessive journal keepers. Keeping a journal is a requirement of their particular order. And yes, a study of the nuns’ IQs showed that they were all well above average. Of course, there were other variables in the nuns’ clean and serene lifestyle that most likely contributed to their intelligence and long life -- but journal keeping is the one key element they all had in common.So there you have it. Buy a notebook, get a pen and carry them wherever you go. Jot down your random thoughts, reflect upon what you write, and soon, you’ll be enjoying your shiny new super-powered IQ!

 

"I've found God" says genome scientist

 

The scientist who led the team that cracked the human genome is to publish a book explaining why he now believes in the existence of God and is convinced that miracles are real. Francis Collins, the director of the US National Human Genome Research Institute, claims there is a rational basis for a creator and that scientific discoveries bring man “closer to God”. His book, The Language of God, to be published in September, will reopen the age-old debate about the relationship between science and faith. “One of the great tragedies of our time is this impression that has been created that science and religion have to be at war,” said Collins, 56. “I don’t see that as necessary at all and I think it is deeply disappointing that the shrill voices that occupy the extremes of this spectrum have dominated the stage for the past 20 years.” For Collins, unravelling the human genome did not create a conflict in his mind. Instead, it allowed him to “glimpse at the workings of God”. “When you make a breakthrough it is a moment of scientific exhilaration because you have been on this search and seem to have found it,” he said.

 

“But it is also a moment where I at least feel closeness to the creator in the sense of having now perceived something that no human knew before but God knew all along. “When you have for the first time in front of you this 3.1 billion-letter instruction book that conveys all kinds of information and all kinds of mystery about humankind, you can’t survey that going through page after page without a sense of awe. I can’t help but look at those pages and have a vague sense that this is giving me a glimpse of God’s mind.” Collins joins a line of scientists whose research deepened their belief in God. Isaac Newton, whose discovery of the laws of gravity reshaped our understanding of the universe, said: “This most beautiful system could only proceed from the dominion of an intelligent and powerful being.”

 

Source: Times Online

 

 

wow! i am so getting a diary! :clap2: :;):

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~freeiran~ jan thx for your nice words and welcome to our Science club. :clap2: :DD

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MI6 payouts over secret LSD tests

 

 

Three UK ex-servicemen have been given compensation after they were given LSD without their consent in the 1950s. The men volunteered to be "guinea pigs" at the government research base Porton Down after being told scientists wanted to find a cure for the common cold. But they were given the hallucinogen in mind control tests, and some volunteers had terrifying hallucinations. The Foreign Office said the secret intelligence body MI6 had made the settlements after legal advice. The out-of-court settlements are thought to be under £10,000 for each of the men. A spokesman for the Foreign Office, which oversees MI6, said: "The settlement offers were made to the government on behalf of the three claimants which, on legal advice, and in the particular circumstances of these cases, the government thinks it appropriate to accept." The men had volunteered for experiments at the government's chemical warfare research base at Porton Down in Wiltshire in 1953 and 1954.

 

Following the settlement, Don Webb, who was a 19-year-old airman at the time, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "I think they grudgingly acknowledged that they did something wrong. "They stick to the old maxim: never apologise, never explain. But I think in this case they have decided to pay some money. I think that is as near to an apology or an explanation I'll get." Both he and fellow serviceman Logan Marr, a former shepherd from the Scottish highlands, suffered hallucinations after they were asked to drink a clear liquid. The third man did not wish to be named. The research was carried out after British and American governments thought the Soviet Union had developed a "truth drug" which could compel spies and servicemen to yield up important secrets. MI6 scientists decided to test LSD, the closest thing they thought they had to a truth drug, on volunteers to see how they reacted.

 

Source: BBC News

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~freeiran~ jan thx for your nice words and welcome to our Science club. :clap2: :DD

 

 

wohooo! mersi siamak khan! :;)::friends:

 

from here on i am releasing my inner science nerd! :DD :DD :DD

 

:haha:

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Who killed the dodo ?

 

 

For such an iconic animal, it seems strange that we know next to nothing about the dodo - except, of course, that it is dead. We don't know how it lived, what it ate, how many eggs it sat on or even whether it was fat or thin. But that could all change with a scientific expedition just begun in Mauritius, the remote island in the Indian Ocean where the dodo lived for millions of years before being driven to extinction in the late 17th century, just 80 years after it was sighted by European sailors.British and Dutch scientists have joined forces to excavate a unique dodo burial ground where the bones of hundreds and possibly thousands of birds have been preserved in marshland for more than 10,000 years. It will be the first time scientists have had access to well-preserved dodo remains that have remained untouched. At last, some light maybe shed on a mysterious and emblematic creature that has come to epitomise how easy it is for man to wipe out a species.The Mare aux Songes area of Mauritius was once a dry coastal forest which later became marshland.

 

Last year scientists said they thought the site contained a mass of bones from a rich variety of animals - giant tortoises, dodos and other extinct birds and reptiles - all of which long pre-date the arrival of the first humans to inhabit Mauritius in 1598. "The discovery is of huge importance and will give us a new understanding of how dodos lived," explained Julian Hume, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Natural History Museum in London who has helped to organise the expedition.

 

Source: Independent

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DNA test to clear up Confucius confusion

 

 

Chinese claiming Confucius for an ancestor can now use a genetic test to prove a direct blood connection to the grandfather of Chinese social mores, a state newspaper said on Friday. The fifth-century BC social philosopher's ideas of filial piety and deference to elders influence Chinese society and politics even today.Now his countrymen can establish a genetic link in a test that will cost more than 1,000 yuan ($125), according to the Shanghai Morning Post."We would like to help these unconfirmed claimants to test their DNA and to establish a Confucius-DNA database," it quoted Deng Yajun, a DNA expert from Beijing Institute of Genomics at the Chinese Academy of Science, as saying.How the scientists had obtained a sample of Confucius's DNA was not explained."One of the most difficult things in the project is to confirm the blood connections of these numerous claimants," said Kong Dewei, one of the editors of the new family tree, who has the same Chinese surname of Confucius, "Kong" in Chinese.

 

Association with Confucianism was fatal during the tumult of the Cultural Revolution, when "old China" and its traditions were condemned as reactionary by fervent Communist Red Guards.But since the 1990s, Beijing has been encouraging Confucianism as part of celebrating traditional Chinese culture -- and of pushing a message of obedience to those in power.

 

 

Source: Reuters

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hey siamak did you hear about the cloning of human embryos from foetuses (foeti? :S ) in Harvard University? I thought human cloning was illegal everywhere :S

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hey siamak did you hear about the cloning of human embryos from foetuses (foeti? :S ) in Harvard University? I thought human cloning was illegal everywhere :S

 

Not in everywhere ! if is anima gen,is not problem ! for human gen, E.U says nothing ,Australia and canada too ! The problem is U.S.A !! Mr Bush is not deagree with this !!

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ahaan! mersi!

 

i know you can clone using animal cells and bacterias and stuff like that, but i didnt know some countries, or the states allow human cloning! hmm..

 

thanks! :air_kiss_wft:

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ahaan! mersi!

 

i know you can clone using animal cells and bacterias and stuff like that, but i didnt know some countries, or the states allow human cloning! hmm..

 

thanks! :air_kiss_wft:

 

taghsireh USA hast keh nemizareh clonning anjam besheh !!! ba in ravesh,mitounan kheili az masael ro hal konan !

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ahaan! mersi!

 

i know you can clone using animal cells and bacterias and stuff like that, but i didnt know some countries, or the states allow human cloning! hmm..

 

thanks! :air_kiss_wft:

 

taghsireh USA hast keh nemizareh clonning anjam besheh !!! ba in ravesh,mitounan kheili az masael ro hal konan !

 

 

what? naaaa, how can that be, when its harvard university that are going to try and clone the first human genes (legally at least) ? :S

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~freeiran~ jan thx for your nice words and welcome to our Science club. :clap2: :DD

 

 

wohooo! mersi siamak khan! :;)::friends:

 

from here on i am releasing my inner science nerd! :DD :DD :DD

 

:haha:

 

 

just dont forget your glasses for a better nerd-image!lol :online2long: :pilot_wft: :nono_wft[1]:

 

mamnoon az in thread siamak jan, man az bachegi kheili alaghe dashatam be in mavared va in no maloomat! moteassefane tabehal vaght nakardam beshinam bekhoonam, one of these days i will sit down and read all posts! its great that you post sources aswell! useful for reference!

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~freeiran~ jan thx for your nice words and welcome to our Science club. :clap2: :DD

 

 

wohooo! mersi siamak khan! :;)::friends:

 

from here on i am releasing my inner science nerd! :DD :DD :DD

 

:haha:

 

 

just dont forget your glasses for a better nerd-image!lol :online2long: :pilot_wft: :nono_wft[1]:

 

mamnoon az in thread siamak jan, man az bachegi kheili alaghe dashatam be in mavared va in no maloomat! moteassefane tabehal vaght nakardam beshinam bekhoonam, one of these days i will sit down and read all posts! its great that you post sources aswell! useful for reference!

 

ageh shoma rouzi 5 min ham vaght bezari,hamin ham basseh ! az ina gozashteh, in chiza barayeh to rahate dark karden dorosteh ghazieh ! man ye vaghtaei bayad 4-5 bar ye article ro bekhunam ta befahmam ghashang dastan chieh !

 

P jan nagofti nazaret chieh about clonning ?

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~freeiran~ jan thx for your nice words and welcome to our Science club. :clap2: :DD

 

 

wohooo! mersi siamak khan! :;)::friends:

 

from here on i am releasing my inner science nerd! :DD :DD :DD

 

:haha:

 

 

just dont forget your glasses for a better nerd-image!lol :online2long: :pilot_wft: :nono_wft[1]:

 

 

:))):)))

 

im working on it actually :p my sight has worsened lately (because of the amount of eye makeup i wear combined with bi cheraagh late night studying i would guess ;) ) , so i might actually have to get myself a pair of hot/nerd - looking pair of glasses :dance_baby_wft:

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~freeiran~ jan thx for your nice words and welcome to our Science club. :clap2: :DD

 

 

wohooo! mersi siamak khan! :;)::friends:

 

from here on i am releasing my inner science nerd! :DD :DD :DD

 

:haha:

 

 

just dont forget your glasses for a better nerd-image!lol :online2long: :pilot_wft: :nono_wft[1]:

 

mamnoon az in thread siamak jan, man az bachegi kheili alaghe dashatam be in mavared va in no maloomat! moteassefane tabehal vaght nakardam beshinam bekhoonam, one of these days i will sit down and read all posts! its great that you post sources aswell! useful for reference!

 

ageh shoma rouzi 5 min ham vaght bezari,hamin ham basseh ! az ina gozashteh, in chiza barayeh to rahate dark karden dorosteh ghazieh ! man ye vaghtaei bayad 4-5 bar ye article ro bekhunam ta befahmam ghashang dastan chieh !

 

P jan nagofti nazaret chieh about clonning ?

 

I'm for it! I don’t think that man is playing God by doing so, they bring up this cliché phrase each time there is a revolutionary progress in science! I think that the whole idea of cloning has been too ”SCI-FI horror” marked and that most people see it as something it isn’t in reality!

 

~freeiran~ jan thx for your nice words and welcome to our Science club. :clap2: :DD

 

 

wohooo! mersi siamak khan! :;)::friends:

 

from here on i am releasing my inner science nerd! :DD :DD :DD

 

:haha:

 

 

just dont forget your glasses for a better nerd-image!lol :online2long: :pilot_wft: :nono_wft[1]:

 

 

:))):)))

 

im working on it actually :p my sight has worsened lately (because of the amount of eye makeup i wear combined with bi cheraagh late night studying i would guess ;) ) , so i might actually have to get myself a pair of hot/nerd - looking pair of glasses :dance_baby_wft:

 

 

oooooo :brows::brows::brows:

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Earliest hominid: Not a hominid at all?

 

 

The earliest known hominid fossil, which dates to about 7 million years ago, is actually some kind of ape, according to an international team of researchers led by the University of Michigan. The finding, they say, suggests scientists should rethink whether we actually descended from apes resembling chimpanzees, which are considered our closest relatives. U-M anthropologist Milford Wolpoff and colleagues examined images and the original paper published on the discovery of the Toumaï cranium (TM 266) or Sahelanthropus tchadensis, as well as a computer reconstruction of the skull. Two other colleagues were actually able to examine the skull, Wolpoff said, in addition to the images and the computer reconstruction. The research team concluded that the cranium did not sit atop the spine but in front of it, indicating the creature walked on all fours like an ape. Hominids, he said, are distinguished from all other primates by walking upright. Hominids are everything on the line leading to humans after divergence with chimpanzees.

 

Upright bipedalism is the single best way of identifying which fossils are hominids. Researchers also examined the canine teeth and found that they were not clearly human or ape-like, but rather like most other canine fossils from the Miocene era. "Whether or not it's a human ancestor is probably unimportant as far as the skull is concerned," Wolpoff said. "But it's very important in trying to understand where humans come from. It's the first relative we've had of the earliest hominid, or something related to it, but it's not a hominid at all."

 

Source: University of Michigan

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Research suggests "hobbit" not new species

 

 

The debate over whether the "hobbit” fossil found on an Indonesian island is a separate species has reignited, as a new study of dwarfing in a range of mammals suggests that Homo floresiensis was a modern human with a pathological condition. The remains of a tiny woman were found in a limestone cave in Flores, Indonesia. Named H. floresiensis by the discoverers, she quickly became known as “the hobbit” by everyone else. When the find was reported in 2004 some anthropologists disputed whether it was a new species of human, arguing that the skeleton had characteristics of a modern human with microcephaly, a condition that causes reduced cranium size. Microcephaly is relatively common in isolated populations and is associated with reduced brain function.Peter Brown and Mike Morwood from the University of New England, Australia, proposed that the 1-metre-tall body (known as LB1) had evolved in an isolated population of Homo erectus as an adaptation to the restricted diet found on an island. But at 380 cubic centimetres, some thought that LB1’s chimp-sized cranial capacity was too small to be a dwarf H. erectus.

 

Brown and Morwood denied this, but their conclusion has now been challenged again. “As they dwarf, species’ brain sizes decline far more slowly than body size,” says Ann MacLarnon from Roehampton University, UK, who modelled dwarfing in a range of mammals from dogs to elephants with a team from the Field Museum, Chicago, US. “Brain size is key to a mammal species’ identity,” she says. There is, for example, hardly any difference in brain size between the smallest modern humans, the 1.4-metre Bambuti people of Congo’s Ituri Forest, and the tallest, the 2-metre Masai of east Africa.

 

Source: New Scientist

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UFO research: Findings vs. facts

 

 

 

For decades now, eyes and sky have met to witness the buzzing of our world by Unidentified Flying Objects, termed UFOs or simply flying saucers. Extraterrestrials have come a long way to purportedly share the friendly skies with us.UFOs and alien visitors are part of our culture—a far-out phenomenon when judged against those "low life" wonders Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster.And after all those years, as the saying goes, UFOs remain a riddle inside a mystery wrapped in an enigma. Why so? For one, the field is fraught with hucksterism. It's also replete with blurry photos and awful video. But then there are also well-intentioned and puzzled witnesses.Scientifically speaking, are UFOs worth keeping an eye on? There have been advances in the field of UFO research, said Ted Roe, Executive Director of the National Aviation Reporting Center on Anomalous Phenomena (NARCAP), based in Vallejo, California. "The capture of optical spectra from mobile, unpredictable luminosities is one of those innovations.

 

More work to be done here but [there are] some good results already."NARCAP was established in 2000 and is dedicated to the advancement of aviation safety issues as they apply to, what they term Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP).Roe said that a decade from now, researchers should have even better instrumentation at their disposal and better data on UAP of several varieties. His forecast is that scientific rigor will prevail, demonstrating that there are "stable, mobile, unusual, poorly documented phenomena with quite unusual properties manifesting within our atmosphere."

 

Source: Space.com

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The chimp messiah, the cow Christ ?

 

 

 

Ken Korczak: Is it possible that animals have a sense of God? Do animals worship, have religion, possess a belief of afterlife? There is evidence that they do, and we began with man’s closest cousin -- the chimpanzee. Dr. Jane Goodall spent more than 40 years observing chimpanzees in their natural environment. One day in 1960, she witnessed something amazing. Watching a group of chimps that had just finished eating, a bolt of lightening suddenly struck nearby, followed by a loud clap of thunder. Immediately, one of the big male chimps stood up and started dancing rhythmically, foot to foot. It then rushed up to a small tree, climbed it and tore off a branch. Two other males, watching, tore off their own branches and began moving toward the chimp in the tree, seemingly using their branches as talismans or wands, waving them ahead of themselves as they ran. The rest of the chimps in the group watched the ceremony, and then joined the males in odd chanting and rhythmic behaviors.Goodall also noticed that certain places, especially those involving moving water, seem sacred to chimps.

 

At one particular 80-foot water fall in the African jungle, Goodall said: “Sometimes the chimpanzees, hair bristling, perform their displays in the stream bed below the falls, swaying rhythmically upright, hurling rocks, climbing the slender hanging vines, and pushing out into the spray. Afterwards a male may sit on a rock at the edge of the streams, looking up at the sheet of living water as it falls, watching as it flows past him on its way to the lake.”Elephants have large brains and are obviously very intelligent. It seems they mourn their dead, perform funeral-like ceremonies, and even gather the bones of dead elephants into graveyards. Early European explorers found many “elephant graveyards,” collections of elephant bones arranged in tell-tale patterns. At first, human cults were suspected, until explorers actually observed elephants themselves collecting the bones of their dead.Elephants have also been observed mourning a recently killed member of their pack, performing elaborate rituals around a dead elephant's body, and sometimes, sitting with their back to corpse, touching it with their tails, while facing the setting sun. You can see photos of this by Wouter Theron at the AnimalSentience.Com web site.All of this makes me recall one spring day when I was 16 years old. My uncle kept a herd of beef cattle on his small northern Minnesota farm. I got an unexpected call one afternoon from my uncle who asked if I could come out and help him butcher a young bull.

 

In a bizarre accident, the bull had broken both its front legs. The only thing my uncle could do was shoot it, and take the meat.By the time I arrived, my uncle was out in the cow pasture. He had the dead bull hoisted up and hanging upside down the front-end loader of a tractor. I joined him, he handed me a large knife. We began the grisly task of gutting and skinning the bull. As we continued our gory job, the rest of the herd of about 30 cows gathered in a near-perfect circle around us. They stood wide-eyed and silent, watching us with their soft bovine eyes, breathing evenly, rhythmically through wide, moist nostrils.My uncle, a Polish Catholic, was nevertheless fond of making slightly irreverent jokes of a religious nature. He said to me: “They way they’re looking at us, it’s like we’re crucifying the Cow Christ.” Never to be outdone, I quipped back at my uncle: “Yes, and remember what Christ commanded. ‘Take my body, and eat of it.’ ”I stopped for a moment, covered with blood up to my armpits, and looked back at the cows. They looked me in the eyes, and looked back to their fallen herd mate. Despite my and my uncle’s waggish humor, the sense of solemnity was palpable. The very air in the center of that cow circle in that green pasture seemed to vibrate at a different level.

 

I felt like an ancient Druid performing a sacrifice, or perhaps like a shaman of the mysterious Catal Huyuk culture of the neolithic, a forgotten civilization known to worship bulls.When our job was done, my uncle trundled the cleaned body of the bull away on the tractor, and the spell was broken. Yet, that feeling -- that sacred cow vibration -- stayed with me. A few years later during my study of physics, I learned about a phenomenon called “entrainment.” My mind leapt back to that day I helped my uncle butcher a bull. Here’s how entrainment works: Put ten grandfather clocks in a small room, and set all of their pendulums going at different times. Come back an hour later, and all the pendulums will be swinging in unison. The reason is entrainment. The vibrations created by each pendulum are transferred through the air, causing all them all to swing in alignment.Maybe that’s what was happening in the center of those cows I had stood among on that day, long ago. Perhaps the prayerful solemnity emanating from the brain impulses of 30 cows in prayer had entrained the very atmosphere within that circle, catching me up in a sacred send-off composed of pure animal spirituality -- of Buddha nature. And get this: There is a famous story of a young Buddhist monk who asked the Zen master Chau chou if it was possible for “a dog to have Buddha nature.” And Chao chou’s famous reply? He said: “Mu.”

Pls read more about Ken Korczak: www.starcopywriter.com

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"Yeti hand" picture goes on display

 

 

Cryptozoologist Marc E.W. Miller and four of his colleagues left Ohio for Nepal and the Tibet border in February 1986 to search for evidence of a yeti - commonly known as the abominable snowman or Bigfoot. When Miller, a Lancaster native, left for his great adventure 22 years ago, he never imagined he would hold what was believed to be the scalp of a yeti, receive possible hair samples from a yeti and take a picture with what is believed to be a yeti's hand."To find something is unexplainable," Miller said. "It's how you feel when you win. ... It's that adventure and excitement." A cryptozoologist is a researcher who studies creatures that haven't been proved to exist. The picture of Miller holding a case with the yeti's hand is now displayed for people from all over the world to see while enjoying the thrills of "Expedition Everest" at Walt Disney World's Animal Kingdom. The Everest Expedtion rollercoaster train stops in the museum briefly during the ride. The ride opened two months ago in the Buena Vista, Fla., Disney theme park and features an exciting real-life depiction of what the Himalayan mountains are like - including a life-like encounter with the yeti. But finding possible evidence of the yeti is the outcome of only one of Miller's world expeditions.

 

Miller, who has practiced as a neuropsychologist in Lancaster for more than 20 years, has been all over the world. He has explored primitive society in Africa, searched for rare animals in China and Egypt, withstood various types of climates and dangerous situations and wrote two books about his adventures. One of his most prized finds was a rare species of the Asian elephant in China. "I was paralyzed when I saw it," he said.

 

Source: Lancaster Eagle Gazette

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The curse of Superman ?

 

 

Christopher Reeve's 1995 accident and death in 2004 revived rumors of the "Superman curse." George Reeves, television's Superman, died under mysterious circumstances on June 16, 1959. Rumors of his demise often claim that he jumped out a window believing he could fly. An Associated Press news report written that day tells a different story that still has a ring of unreality. Reeves' fiancee, Lenore Lemmon, told police that two guests awakened the couple in the middle of the night. After arguing with one of the visitors, Reeves apologized and headed back to bed. According to the story: when Reeves left the room, Lemmon "jokingly remarked, "Well, he'll probably shoot himself.' A drawer was heard to open and she said she remarked, "Well, he's getting a gun.' Then a shot was heard. Reeves had killed himself with a bullet in the temple." Many people believe that Reeves was murdered, possibly because of his romantic involvement with Toni Mannix, the wife of MGM executive Eddie Mannix, who was believed to have Mafia ties. Other misfortunes include:

 

• Mental illness of Margot Kidder, who played Lois Lane with Reeve.

• Multiple sclerosis, which killed Richard Pryor, who appeared in "Superman III."

 

While both George Reeves and Christopher Reeve died untimely deaths, other actors who have played Superman lived long lives. In 2005, Kidder, who ought to know, told the Guardian newspaper, "With any group of people in life, sad things happen, and crazy things, and happy things. When you're in the public eye, it's just amplified, that's all. There's no curse."

 

Source: Buffalo News

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Theorists unmoved by UFO denial

 

 

Last month, the British Ministry of Defence made public a top secret report on UFOs, concluding that three decades of sightings had failed to produce evidence of visiting extraterrestrials. Case closed for alien aficionados? Not so. Far from alleviating UFO buffs’ suspicions that governments are concealing what they know, the report has intensified them. “I just e-mailed the MoD explaining my disgust at their latest UFO report,” an Internet UFO forum member wrote, saying the Ministry was in denial.Instead of alien spacecraft, man-made vehicles and natural phenomena, some of them little known, were behind the UFO sighting, according to the report.David Clarke, a journalist and folklorist who used freedom of information laws to gain access to the report, said UFO believers would not accept any explanation for the phenomenon other than the extraterrestrial one. Last year, the alien hypothesis gained a prominent supporter in Paul Hellyer, a former Canadian defense minister, who told a conference that UFOs were “as real as the airplanes that fly over your head.”

 

Nick Pope, a Defense Ministry official who worked on UFO cases from 1991 to 1994, said he did not rule out aliens as the explanation for UFOs, but added there was no conclusive proof. If there are alien visitors, “the lack of artefacts is a significant mystery,” the report said.

 

 

Source: Reuters

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The chimp messiah, the cow Christ ?

 

 

 

Ken Korczak: Is it possible that animals have a sense of God? Do animals worship, have religion, possess a belief of afterlife? There is evidence that they do, and we began with man’s closest cousin -- the chimpanzee. Dr. Jane Goodall spent more than 40 years observing chimpanzees in their natural environment. One day in 1960, she witnessed something amazing. Watching a group of chimps that had just finished eating, a bolt of lightening suddenly struck nearby, followed by a loud clap of thunder. Immediately, one of the big male chimps stood up and started dancing rhythmically, foot to foot. It then rushed up to a small tree, climbed it and tore off a branch. Two other males, watching, tore off their own branches and began moving toward the chimp in the tree, seemingly using their branches as talismans or wands, waving them ahead of themselves as they ran. The rest of the chimps in the group watched the ceremony, and then joined the males in odd chanting and rhythmic behaviors.Goodall also noticed that certain places, especially those involving moving water, seem sacred to chimps.

 

At one particular 80-foot water fall in the African jungle, Goodall said: “Sometimes the chimpanzees, hair bristling, perform their displays in the stream bed below the falls, swaying rhythmically upright, hurling rocks, climbing the slender hanging vines, and pushing out into the spray. Afterwards a male may sit on a rock at the edge of the streams, looking up at the sheet of living water as it falls, watching as it flows past him on its way to the lake.”Elephants have large brains and are obviously very intelligent. It seems they mourn their dead, perform funeral-like ceremonies, and even gather the bones of dead elephants into graveyards. Early European explorers found many “elephant graveyards,” collections of elephant bones arranged in tell-tale patterns. At first, human cults were suspected, until explorers actually observed elephants themselves collecting the bones of their dead.Elephants have also been observed mourning a recently killed member of their pack, performing elaborate rituals around a dead elephant's body, and sometimes, sitting with their back to corpse, touching it with their tails, while facing the setting sun. You can see photos of this by Wouter Theron at the AnimalSentience.Com web site.All of this makes me recall one spring day when I was 16 years old. My uncle kept a herd of beef cattle on his small northern Minnesota farm. I got an unexpected call one afternoon from my uncle who asked if I could come out and help him butcher a young bull.

 

In a bizarre accident, the bull had broken both its front legs. The only thing my uncle could do was shoot it, and take the meat.By the time I arrived, my uncle was out in the cow pasture. He had the dead bull hoisted up and hanging upside down the front-end loader of a tractor. I joined him, he handed me a large knife. We began the grisly task of gutting and skinning the bull. As we continued our gory job, the rest of the herd of about 30 cows gathered in a near-perfect circle around us. They stood wide-eyed and silent, watching us with their soft bovine eyes, breathing evenly, rhythmically through wide, moist nostrils.My uncle, a Polish Catholic, was nevertheless fond of making slightly irreverent jokes of a religious nature. He said to me: “They way they’re looking at us, it’s like we’re crucifying the Cow Christ.” Never to be outdone, I quipped back at my uncle: “Yes, and remember what Christ commanded. ‘Take my body, and eat of it.’ ”I stopped for a moment, covered with blood up to my armpits, and looked back at the cows. They looked me in the eyes, and looked back to their fallen herd mate. Despite my and my uncle’s waggish humor, the sense of solemnity was palpable. The very air in the center of that cow circle in that green pasture seemed to vibrate at a different level.

 

I felt like an ancient Druid performing a sacrifice, or perhaps like a shaman of the mysterious Catal Huyuk culture of the neolithic, a forgotten civilization known to worship bulls.When our job was done, my uncle trundled the cleaned body of the bull away on the tractor, and the spell was broken. Yet, that feeling -- that sacred cow vibration -- stayed with me. A few years later during my study of physics, I learned about a phenomenon called “entrainment.” My mind leapt back to that day I helped my uncle butcher a bull. Here’s how entrainment works: Put ten grandfather clocks in a small room, and set all of their pendulums going at different times. Come back an hour later, and all the pendulums will be swinging in unison. The reason is entrainment. The vibrations created by each pendulum are transferred through the air, causing all them all to swing in alignment.Maybe that’s what was happening in the center of those cows I had stood among on that day, long ago. Perhaps the prayerful solemnity emanating from the brain impulses of 30 cows in prayer had entrained the very atmosphere within that circle, catching me up in a sacred send-off composed of pure animal spirituality -- of Buddha nature. And get this: There is a famous story of a young Buddhist monk who asked the Zen master Chau chou if it was possible for “a dog to have Buddha nature.” And Chao chou’s famous reply? He said: “Mu.”

Pls read more about Ken Korczak: www.starcopywriter.com

 

This was really interesting, mersi siamak jan! :friends:

I was so amazed by the elephants rituals, and the chimps... very interesting!

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Team claims discovery of Noah's Ark

 

 

A team of Texas archaeologists believe they may have located the remains of Noah's Ark in Iran's Elburz mountain range. "I can't imagine what it could be if it is not the Ark," said Arch Bonnema of the Bible Archaeology Search and Exploration (B.A.S.E) Institute, a Christian archeology organization dedicated to looking for biblical artifacts. Bonnema and the other B.A.S.E. Institute members hiked for seven hours in the mountains northwest of Tehran, climbing 13,000 feet before making the apparent discovery. "We got up to this object, nestled in the side of a hill," said Robert Cornuke, a member of the B.A.S.E. Institute. "We found something that has my heart skipping a beat." At first, they didn't dare to hope it was the biblical boat. "It wasn't impressive at first," Cornuke said. "Certainly didn't think it to be Noah's Ark. But when we got close, we were amazed. It looked similar to wood." In addition, some B.A.SE. members say, their discovery didn't look very distinctive. "It looked like the deck of any boat today," Bonnema said. The Bible places the Ark in the mountains of Ararat, a mountain range theologians believe spans hundreds of miles, which the team says is consistent with their find in Iran.

 

The Bible also describes the Ark's dimensions as being 300 cubits by 50 cubits -- about the size of a small aircraft carrier. The B.A.S.E. Institute's discovery is similar in size and scale. "It is provocative to think that this could be the lost ark of Noah," Cornuke said Throughout history, people have been searching for the Ark to help prove God's existence. "There's this idea, if we can prove that the ark existed then we can prove that the story existed, and more importantly, we can prove that God existed," said Bruce Feiler, author of "Where God Was Born." Previous scholars have searched for the Ark on Mount Ararat in Turkey. "Czar Nicholas, actually, in 1916 sent two expeditions to photograph it on top of Mount Ararat," said Feiler. One former U.S. president, Feiler said, looked for it in the mountains of Iran.

 

Source: ABC Local

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